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Call for Nominations: SIAM Chair Elect

Call for Nominations: SIAM Chair Elect

The Section on Intergovernmental Administration and Management (SIAM) of the American Society for Public Administration (ASPA) is seeking nominations for an executive officer. The SIAM Nominations Committee, chaired by Jayce Farmer and committee members Meghan Rubado and Kendra Stewart, is seeking nominees for the position of chair-elect. The chair-elect will serve a two year term (2022-2024) and then serve two years in the position of chair (2024-2026).  Please see our SIAM blog for the full list of current Executive Committee members as well as the bylaws governing elections.

Executive committee members are actively engaged in the governance and work of the section, often contributing service to the Section’s committees and events.  Together with the Chair, Chair-Elect, Secretary and Treasurer, Executive Committee members help guide SIAM’s ongoing contributions to the fields of intergovernmental administration and management.  The Chair facilitates the work of the section, chairs executive committee meetings and business meetings, and serves as a primary channel of communication with ASPA.

Please submit your nominations for the Chair-Elect to Jayce Farmer (jayce.farmer@unlv.edu) on or before January 8, 2021.

The Nominations Committee will share a slate of nominees with the SIAM membership by January 9, 2021. After this, the Nominating Committee will receive additional nominations through membership petitions between January 9 and February 9, 2021.  Additional nominations during the petition period must be signed by 25 members of SIAM and accompanied by a statement from the nominee expressing interest and willingness to serve the Section.  Election ballots will be distributed to the membership after February 15 and election results will be announced at the annual business meeting at the virtual ASPA conference in April 2021.

Call for Proposals: New Editor of State and Local Government Review

SAGE Publishing and SLGR’s sponsor, SIAM, are seeking proposals for the editorship of SLGR, for the term beginning January 1, 2021.slgb_51_4.cover

State and Local Government Review (SLGR), peer-reviewed and published quarterly, provides a forum for the exchange of ideas among practitioners and academics that contributes to the knowledge and practice of state and local government politics, policy, and management. Of particular interest in SLGR are articles that focus on state and local governments and those that explore the intergovernmental dimensions of public-sector activity.

Founded by the Carl Vinson Institute of Government of the University of Georgia, State and Local Government Review is the official journal of the Section on Intergovernmental Administration and Management (SIAM) of the American Society for Public Administration. Since 1968 the Review has provided a forum for the exchange of ideas among practitioners and academics that contributes to the knowledge and practice of state and local government politics, policy, and management. Like the Vinson Institute, SIAM has an interest not only in state and local government, but also in the effective interaction among public officials in a federal system. It seeks to foster the dissemination of information about research and experience that contributes to the understanding and improvement of the intergovernmental system.

The Editor will be responsible for soliciting, reviewing, and making final decisions on submissions to the journal, and will manage all aspects of the publication and review process using the Manuscript Central electronic submission and review platform. Editor is expected to maintain timely and effective communication, advance journal performance, and work towards upholding SLGR’s high-quality standard.

In their proposals, candidates should discuss their vision for SLGR and how the journal can advance an interdisciplinary study of state and local government. They should also discuss how they will identify and promote new perspectives for the student of state and local government—including subtopics, research questions, framing, terminology, theoretical approaches, methodology, and data sources.

 

Applicants should send a letter of application which includes their vision for the future of the journal and a description of their qualifications for the editorship. Applicants should also include copies of their CV.

 
Applications, nominations, and requests for additional information should be sent electronically to Ian Balisy, Associate Editor, at Ian.Balisy@sagepub.com. Please put “SLGR Editor Application” in the subject line of your email.

 

Call for Papers – Governance Matters section of State and Local Government Review

Call for Papers – Governance Matters section of State and Local Government Review

The Governance Matters (GM) section of State and Local Government Review (SLGR) invites complete submissions as well as proposals from authors for individual articles or topic specific collections in a symposium format for potential publication in 2021. Prospective authors are encouraged to contact Grant Rissler, SLGR GM Editor (risslerge@vcu.edu) about any ideas for this section of the journal.

The GM section of SLGR features peer reviewed applied research on state and local government of interest to both practitioners and academics.  In 2018, GM articles represented 3 of the 5 top downloaded articles from SLGR.  Mainstream news sources such as the New York Times, USA Today, Wall Street Journal, The Hill, among others, have cited a 2019 GM article.

Articles published in the GM Section may include case studies or other empirical pieces and should highlight implications for a practice as well as academic knowledge.  In the past, a variety of timely governance topics included:

  • social media use
  • capital budgeting
  • local government fiscal health
  • core values in local government organizations in practice
  • mitigation strategies in flood control
  • social equity impacts at the local level of federal budget choices
  • environmental sustainability
  • local home rule and municipal takeover
  • municipal human resource strategies in challenging times
  • alternatives in city-county consolidation decisions
  • adopting and implementing recreational marijuana policies

Submissions from early career and international scholars are specifically welcomed.

Call for Proposals: SLGR 2020 Special Issue

CALL FOR PROPOSALS
State and Local Government Review
2020 Special Issue:
“Filling a Vacuum: Subnational Governance amidst National Government Inaction”

Michael J. Scicchitano, University of Florida, Editor

Andrew Karch, University of Minnesota, Guest Editor

As the United States battled the coronavirus pandemic in early April, President Donald J. Trump tweeted that the role of the national government was to serve as a “backup” to state and local governments. This remark sparked sharp criticism from governors across the country, and even Republicans like Governor Asa Hutchinson of Arkansas called for a new approach to procuring essential medical supplies. States, localities, and the national government struggled to coordinate with one another and frequently found themselves locked in conflict.

Subnational officials always play a central role during disasters, and the coronavirus pandemic is no different. While many called for a national “stay-at-home” order, the decision to declare a state of emergency or to shutter public schools and other institutions fell to governors, mayors, and school superintendents. This dynamic caused one observer to urge voters to “remember that who sits in state and local offices, and how they engage with federal authorities, may be the most important decision they have to make” (Roberts 2020).

While the coronavirus pandemic is (hopefully) a once-in-a-lifetime event, the intergovernmental dynamics it sparked are not uncommon in the contemporary United States. Partisan polarization has rendered the national government unwilling or unable to address a range of pressing issues, leading subnational governments to try to resolve them on their own. Examples abound of policy arenas where the national government has either failed to craft realistic solutions or has instead sent mixed signals. Often these problems are then passed down to states and localities where they cannot be ignored. States and localities have taken the lead on issues like immigration, adopting a wide range of approaches in a domain that many once viewed as the exclusive responsibility of the national government. Similarly, the absence of a national policy on sustainability has sparked a “contested federalism” dynamic as American lawmakers grapple with the challenge of climate change (Rabe 2011). The delayed reauthorization of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA) and the repeated congressional failure to address the issue of Internet sales taxation provide additional illustrations of intergovernmental policy issues where the national government has been slow to act.

The objective of this special issue is to publish original research that examines the implications of this emerging intergovernmental dynamic. We hope to include five or six short articles (about 6,500 words each) on individual policy areas where subnational governments have filled the vacuum left by national government inaction. Appropriate policy areas are not limited to the ones listed above. The specific implications addressed in individual articles can take multiple forms, but two types of consequences seem especially significant. First, what does state and local government activity imply for governance in a federal system? Do subnational officials have the necessary expertise, financial resources, and administrative capacity to implement effective programs in a specific domain? Do the designers of these policies demonstrate the ability to learn from earlier successes and failures? Do they take into account the possibility of policy overload? Do they put evaluation mechanisms in place to assess whether a program is achieving its objectives?

The governance-related implications of subnational leadership extend beyond individual policy arenas, and we welcome manuscripts that think broadly about what it means for the functioning of the American political system. In a recent book, Karen Orren and Stephen Skowronek (2017, 6) describe the emergence of a “policy state” that renders “achievements provisional, protections unreliable, and commitments dependent on who is next in charge.” Does the absence of national leadership, and the primacy of state and local governments, in a specific policy area indicate that the federal system is somehow out of balance, or is it an indication that the system is functioning as intended? Customization and experimentation are typically portrayed as benefits of American federalism. Do scholars need to reconsider this standard assessment? Has subnational leadership produced geographic variation or policy gyrations that undermine programs’ abilities to achieve their goals?

In an era of partisan polarization, it is not enough to note that subnational governments are filling the vacuum left by national government inaction. They are also moving in different—often very different—policy directions. States and localities under Republican control are taking actions that diverge considerably from those occurring in jurisdictions where Democrats control the levers of power. This variation generates a second significant set of implications. What it means to belong to the American community is increasingly defined in geographic terms. The rights that residents possess, such as the ability to exercise the right to vote or to bear arms, depend on where they live. The government services available to them, and their ability to gain access to those services, depend on where they live. Does this variation indicate that the federal system is working largely as intended, or are there specific policy domains in which geography should be irrelevant? Does the partisan nature of this variation prevent state and local officials from the institutional learning that is characteristic of good governance? Articles might grapple with these and other normative questions as they consider recent developments in specific policy domains.

Please submit a proposal that identifies a specific policy arena in which subnational governments have adopted major policy changes in response to the inaction of the national government. The proposal should clearly describe the nature of this subnational activity and the research strategy that will be used to assess its implications. If this assessment will be based on quantitative data, please indicate whether these data have already been collected. To ensure that the manuscript can meet the tight schedule outlined below, please also identify the current status of the research and writing.

We encourage proposals from all disciplines including but not limited to public administration, political science, sociology, economics, and planning. We expect to publish papers where there is collaboration between academics and practitioners and authors both from inside and outside the United States.

Proposals should be submitted between April 15, 2020 and June 1, 2020 to the following email address: slgrspissue@gmail.com.

The proposals should be double-spaced and include no more than two pages of text. There is no need to include tables or appendices, and references do not count against the two-page limit. All proposals will be subject to editorial review. Please do not send complete papers—if you have a draft of your paper, please note that in the proposal.

Submissions will be evaluated with respect to the following criteria:

  • The proposed manuscript should examine a policy area where state and local governments filled a vacuum left by national government inaction. It should investigate the broader implications of the subnational policy activity, not simply describe it.
  • The proposal should represent an achievable manuscript project within the tight time constraints outlined below.
  • Scope of Interest. Papers of broad interest to scholars and professionals will be preferred.
  • Organization and Coherence. The proposal should follow a logical structure, read clearly, and thoroughly represent the available research.
  • Insight for Future Work. The proposal should convey important implications for both future research and practice related to local government.

Due to editorial constraints, it is vital for authors to adhere to the following strict timeline. If you have any questions, please contact the Editor at mscicc@ufl.edu or by phone at (352) 846-2874.

Relevant dates* are as follows:

  • April 15 – June 1, 2020: Proposals due to the State and Local Government Review to be sent to slgrspissue@gmail.com
  • June 15, 2020: Final decision on proposals and initial feedback provided to authors.
  • September 15, 2020: Full draft of paper due to State and Local Government Review.
  • October 15, 2020: Review and feedback to authors on full paper.
  • November 15, 2020: Final paper submitted to State and Local Government Review. Final manuscripts should be no longer than 18 pages of text with standard margins and font size.

*Please note that these are basic guidelines; each paper may require a different number of revisions or timing to make the November 15, 2020 deadline

Feel free to email (ajkarch@umn.edu) me if you have any questions regarding your proposal or manuscript.

References

Orren, Karen, and Stephen Skowronek. The Policy State: An American Predicament. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 2017.

Rabe, Barry. 2011. Contested Federalism and American Climate Policy. Publius: The Journal of Federalism 41(3):494-521.

Roberts, Patrick S. 2020. “Never Mind Trump. Coronavirus Shows Why Electing Competent State and Local Officials Is Vital.” The Washington Post. March 8.

SIAM Annual Awards

The ASPA Section on Intergovernmental Administration & Management (SIAM) is currently soliciting nominations for the section’s annual awards. The awards will be presented at the 2020 annual ASPA meeting in Anaheim, CA. Please consider submitting nominations or forwarding this call for nominations to your colleagues. Nominees and nominators need not be members of SIAM. The awards include the following:

Donald C. Stone Practitioner Award (recognizes outstanding practitioners for their contributions to intergovernmental management). The principle criteria for the Practitioner award include:

  • Significant contributions to the practice of intergovernmental relations over a substantial period of time.
  • Contributions that have made an impact on the practice of intergovernmental management as a whole rather than only on a specific organization, institution, or function.

Donald C. Stone Distinguished Scholar Award (recognizes distinguished scholars for their contributions to intergovernmental management). The principle criteria for the Distinguished Scholar Award include:

  • Significant contributions to the study of intergovernmental relations over a substantial period of time.
  • Contributions that have made an impact on the study of intergovernmental management as a whole rather than only on a specific organization, institution, or function.

Donald C. Stone Best Student Paper Award (recognizes the best paper on federalism and intergovernmental relations written by a graduate student in 2019).

  • The Best Student Paper Award comes with $250 to support travel to the ASPA conference (April 3-7, 2020).
  • Nominations should include an electronic copy of the nominated paper.

Nominations should include the name and institutional affiliation of the nominee and of the nominator, a short statement explaining the nominee’s contributions to intergovernmental management commensurate with the criteria for the award (for the Practitioner and Scholar awards), and contact information for both the nominee and the nominator. Nominees and nominators need not be members of SIAM.

Please submit your nominations or questions electronically to award committee chair Todd Ely at todd.ely@ucdenver.edu. For the nomination to be considered by the committee, please submit your nomination before 5:00 pm, February 14, 2020. Visit the SIAM website for a full list of past awardees.

Call for Nominations: SIAM Executive Committee and Chair Elect

The SIAM Nominations Committee, chaired by Eric Zeemering and committee members Ann Bowman and Jay Rickabaugh, is seeking 3 candidates for the SIAM Executive Committee and nominees for the position of chair-elect.  The term for the Executive Committee is 2020-2023.  The chair-elect will serve a two year term (2020-2022) and then serve two years in the position of chair (2022-2024).  Please see our SIAM blog for the full list of current Executive Committee members as well as the bylaws governing elections.

Executive committee members are actively engaged in the governance and work of the section, often contributing service to the Section’s committees and events.  Together with the Chair, Chair-Elect, Secretary and Treasurer, Executive Committee members help guide SIAM’s ongoing contributions to the fields of intergovernmental administration and management.  The Chair facilitates the work of the section, chairs executive committee meetings and business meetings, and serves as a primary channel of communication with ASPA.

Please submit your nominations for the four Executive Committee Member positions to Eric Zeemering (eric.zeemering@uga.edu) on or before January 30, 2020.

The Nominations Committee will share a slate of nominees with the SIAM membership by January 15, 2020.  After this, the Nominating Committee will receive additional nominations through membership petition between January 15 and February 15, 2020.  Additional nominations during the petition period must be signed by 25 members of SIAM and accompanied by a statement from the nominee expressing interest and willingness to serve the Section.  Election ballots will be distributed to the membership after February 15 and election results will be announced at the annual business meeting at the ASPA conference in Anaheim, CA.